Course Brief

Prospective employers often require that the student is able to tackle a non-standard problem, organise their work and present their conclusions both orally and in a written report. Similarly admissions tutors for Postgraduate courses and Research awards need to be reasonably certain that an applicant will be able to research a topic and write a corresponding thesis. This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to develop their ability to plan, organise and work independently on, a selected problem, drawing on and extending ideas encountered during the programme of study. The student is expected to critically evaluate the work of others and relate it to their own work where appropriate.

  • This course is offered in 120 hours

By the end of the course the student will have:

  • Assessed the scope and feasibility of a project requiring between 150 and 200 hours of individual effort.
  • Used project management techniques to plan, organise, schedule and control their project.
  • Produced a formal Project Proposal that includes justification for the project and an appropriate set of objectives for the project.
  • Undertaken an appropriate literature study, using a variety of sources and methods for collecting reference material.
  • Identified problems to be resolved during the project life cycle, and determined possible solutions to these problems.
  • Demonstrated analytical thinking.
  • Carried the project through to a logical conclusion.

Projects must involve the design and implementation of a software product and a written report (dissertation) of the project and the development process.

Students may undertake projects arising from:

suggestions put forward by college staff
their workplace
or they may suggest one themselves.

All project proposals must be agreed with the project supervisor

The student will have regular meetings with their supervisor who will ask about progress and give advice and guidance throughout the year. The student should keep a journal of their work and meetings and may be required to produce it.

The student will attend a series of project lectures given at appropriate times during the year. The project lectures are intended to provide students with information and guidance on all aspects of carrying out an undergraduate project.

The student will be required to give a demonstration of their software product to their supervisor and the second marker for the project.

Coursework 7,000 – 10,000 100% To assess learning outcomes A – G

The supervisor and second marker will complete the relevant assessment forms for the components of the project (see below).

Assessment Components for a Development Project

A. Development – 30 %

The development mark is intended to be the supervisor’s assessment of how well the student plans, organises and manages their project. It will reflect the ability of the student to:

1. Organise and carry out an effective literature study.
2. Plan, organise and manage their work in an independent manner.
3. Plan and carry out an effective literature search.
4. Submit satisfactory intermediate project deliverables.
5. Understand fundamental concepts relevant to their work.
6. Evaluate and select appropriate methods and techniques.
7. Identify problems and formulate solutions to overcome them where possible.
8. The inherent conceptual and technical difficulty of the project

B. Final Product – 30%

This is intended to assess the quality of the end product as a technical design and implementation. The assessment will reflect:

1. How well the student has applied appropriate methods and techniques.
2. Quality checks in the development process.
3. Test plan, testing carried out and evaluation of test results.
4. Usability of the product.
5. Completeness of the implementation.

C. Report – 40%

This is intended to assess the quality of the project report. The assessment will reflect:

1. The logical organisation, formatting and presentation of the project report.
2. The clarity and quality of the written English.
3. Evidence (normally through a literature review) that a literature study has been carried out.
4. Appropriate and well organised referencing and bibliography.
5. Description of the methods, tools and techniques used and the development framework in which they have been applied.
6. A critical evaluation of the development process, the experience and the lessons learnt.
7. A critical appraisal of the product.

  • Computing and Information Systems Top-up degree

    The University of Greenwich BSc Computing and Information Systems top-up degree is professionally accredited by the British Computer Society (BCS), the Chartered Engineering Institution for Information Systems Engineering, and recognised by the Accreditation Council of Trinidad and Tobago.

    This IT degree aims to bridge the gap between academia and industry. The courses have been designed in conjunction with both the local and international industry, and are continually monitored to ensure they match the needs of this exciting but fast changing industry.

    It is an excellent programme for Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Higher National Diploma holders who are ready to earn a bachelors degree in the field of Information Technology.

    The assessment criteria are predominantly assignment based, providing many real life problems which require solutions. Graduating students often tend to create a portfolio of work which proves to be a valuable asset.

    In order to obtain the BSc. (Hons) Computing and Information Systems degree, students will pursue -

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    At SBCS we focus on -

    Highlights at a glance -

    • Final Year (Top-up)
    • Accredited by the British Computer Society (Global Recognition and Portability)
    • Multiple Modes of Delivery (Full/Part Time)
    • Multiple Campuses
    • Expert Lecturers